John Howard Griffin’s 'Black Like Me' turns 50 — and you can join the discussion

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Have questions about John Howard Griffin’s devilishly daring journalistic approach? Now is the time to ask. Join Gemini Ink and Trinity University for a panel discussion honoring the 50th anniversary celebration of the publication of Griffin's Black Like Me.

Born in Mansfield, Griffin was known for writing about racial inequality. With funding from Sepia magazine, Griffin was able to go deep undercover for the investigative role of a lifetime. Using dyes to change his skin color, he underwent a physical and mental transformation in an attempt to live the life of an unemployed black man in the Deep South. Black Like Me is a nonfiction account of his six weeks traveling through predominantly black areas of different cities.

Roberto Bonazzi, the author of the critically acclaimed biography on Griffin Man in the Mirror and John Howard Griffin’s literary executor, will be on the panel with Michael Nye (photographer), Gary W. Houston (urban activist, lecturer in political science and geography at UTSA), Carmen Tafolla (poet, writer, lecturer at UTSA), Anne Wallace (artist), and Cary Clack (writer).

The book was originally published in 1961 but was re-released by Wings Press for the Griffin Estate Edition. Copies of the book will be available for purchase after the discussion. The event will be at 2-3:30pm Thursday, November 10, and held at Northrup Hall 040, Trinity University. For more info go to geminiink.org

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