5 Things You Have To Do This Week

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Monday, February 2
Groundhog Day Dinner Party

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The Alamo Drafthouse will serve you three different types of pie during Bill Murray's classic, Groundhog Day. Murray plays Phil Connors, an egotistical Pittsburgh weatherman who hates nothing more than Groundhog Day. He detests covering the annual festival in nearby Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, and he especially despises sharing his name with the town’s celebrated rodent. Phil hopes to get in and out of the small town as soon as possible, but a blizzard strands him overnight and Phil wakes up to find out there is no next day. It’s still February 2. $35, 7pm Monday, Alamo Drafthouse Park North, 618 NW Loop 410, (210) 677-8500, drafthouse.com.

Monday, February 2
Segundo de Febrero


Artwork by Alexa Nelipa - COURTESY
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  • Artwork by Alexa Nelipa

Monday is the 167th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the U.S.-Mexican War, extended the border to the Rio Grande and gave the U.S. control over 500,000 square miles that now comprise the Southwest. Each year, Centro Cultural Aztlan commemorates this event with a “Segundo de Febrero” art show designed to spark dialogue about the nature of the bi-cultural consciousness. This year’s exhibit is curated by artist Jeff Hull — whose work explores Mexican- American identity — and will feature the work of more than 35 other artists. Lead Artist and Curator Jeff Hull, along with local and regional artists and poets honor the diverse contributions of Mexican Americans in the Arts and other fields with a group exhibition and poetry readings. Free, 6-9pm Monday, Centro Cultural Aztlan, 1800 Fredericksburg,  (210) 432-1896, centroaztlan.org.

Tuesday, February 3
Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story

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Lubbock-born Buddy Holly’s destiny became clear the night he saw Elvis Presley in 1955. From there, he developed a signature rockabilly style as both a solo artist and frontman for The Crickets. By 1957, Holly and the Crickets were among the acts bridging the racial divide through music. Penned by Alan Janes, the jukebox musical Buddy follows the early rock ‘n’ roll influencer in the less than two-year period between his quick rise and untimely death by plane crash on February 3, 1959. This performance marks the 56th anniversary of “The Day the Music Died.” $34.50-$74.50, 7:30pm Tuesday, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 223-8624, tobincenter.org. 

Tuesday, February 3
Caddywhompus 

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  • Caddywhompus

Here’s a show that will set your brain a-sizzling. New Orleans’ duo Caddywhompus, aside from the brilliant name, is remarkable for its ability to turn gray matter into jelly with its mathy, noisy, mildly psychedelic and totally righteous brand of arty indie rock. ATX’s Boyfrndz, for its part, makes experimental psych-rock with prog-rock tendencies and an uncommon knack for sweeping and jarring soundscapes. Support will be provided by SA’s own Bright Like the Sun, whose dynamic brand of post-rock truly blossoms on the band’s forthcoming sophomore album, and Ants, who make hard-edged, improvisational, post-shoegaze music. $5, 9pm Tuesday, 502 Bar, 502 Embassy Oaks, (210) 257-8125.

Wednesday, February 4
Doris Kearns Goodwin Presentation 

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Doris Kearns Goodwin, renowned presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize winning author, will present “Leadership Lessons of History: Doris Kearns Goodwin on the American Presidents” as the guest speaker for the 2015 Flora Cameron Lecture on Politics and Public Affairs at Trinity University. Her work has also been the source material for movies and documentaries. Her book, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, was used as the basis for the film Lincoln by Steven Spielberg. Free, 7:30pm Wednesday, Laurie Auditorium, Trinity University, 715 Stadium Drive, (210) 999-8117, trinity.edu.

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