Things to Do in San Antonio This Week (11/8-11/14)

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LILI RENAUD DEWAR
  • Lili Renaud Dewar
Thu 11/9
International Artist-in-Residence Exhibitions

If Artpace’s renowned International Artist-in-Residence program and its entirely unpredictable exhibition series have taught San Antonio anything, it’s to expect the unexpected. While exhibitions here often push viewers beyond the comfort zones museums might offer, the institution Linda Pace left behind never fails to spark conversations about art, commerce, concepts, aesthetics, politics and points in between. Carrying on a yearlong string of practicing artists guest-curating the series (which annually invites three guest curators to each select a trio of artists — one from Texas, one from elsewhere in the U.S. and one from abroad — to “live and create art in San Antonio for two months”), Brooklyn/Austin-based Michael Smith summoned a performative and collaborative spirit by uniting Heyd Fontenot (Dallas), Martha Wilson (New York) and Lili Reynaud-Dewar (France/Switzerland). A truly versatile artist whose work tackles cultural norms, spirituality, morality and sexuality, Fontenot is perhaps known best for paintings and drawings that put an intimate, slightly playful spin on portraiture, but he’s spent his time at Artpace building an “occupied installation” that invites both exploration and interpretation. Having creatively investigated unlikely intersections between Martin Luther King Jr., cyborgs and blinged-out teeth covers known commonly as “grills,” Reynaud-Dewar went west to shoot a short horror film amid the stark, dramatic vistas of Marfa. Hailed as a pioneering feminist artist who founded the avant-garde art space Franklin Furnace in New York circa 1976, Wilson expanded her “First Ladies” self-portrait series with a new video piece in which she stars as Melania Trump. Free, 6-9pm (on view through Dec. 31), Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org. — Bryan Rindfuss
DREW REYNOLDS
  • Drew Reynolds
Thu 11/9
Los Lobos

In a musical landscape littered with “genreless” artists, Los Lobos stand out as fusionist pioneers with an undying love of experimentation. Rising out of ’70s-era East LA with a repertoire that blurred blues, roots and Mexican folkloric sounds, the group scored a Grammy before their major label debut (1984’s How Will the Wolf Survive?) and reached the masses in 1987 with a chart-topping cover of Ritchie Valens’ classic “La Bamba.” Touted by critics for their surreal 1992 album Kiko, the band returns to Gruene Hall for an evening sure to be peppered with eclectic favorites spanning four decades, along with hidden gems from their latest (2015’s Gates of Gold) and hopefully the whimsical 2009 tribute Los Lobos Goes Disney. Fans can help shape Thursday’s set list by requesting songs at loslobos.org. $35, 8pm, Gruene Hall, 1281 Gruene Road, New Braunfels, (830) 606-1281, gruenehall.com. — BR

COURTESY
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Fri 11/10
Spurs vs. Bucks

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo returns to San Antonio on Friday night, riding a wave of early season MVP hype fueled by phenomenal play. The Greek Freak has taken a leap in his fifth NBA campaign, putting up stellar numbers for a Milwaukee team intent on staking its claim in an underwhelming Eastern Conference. After a solid start, the Spurs offense has shown signs of sputtering on the road, with turnovers and injuries to key personnel ultimately taking their toll. It will take a team effort from San Antonio to slow down Antetokounmpo, and a healthy Kawhi Leonard would be a good start. Consistent contributions from Dejounte Murray and Patty Mills at the point could help right the ship for the Spurs until NBA Finals MVP Tony Parker is cleared to return. $13-$1,474, 8pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy., (210) 444-5000, attcenter.com. — M. Solis

COURTESY
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Fri 11/10
Flamenco Legends

In the 1970s, Paco de Lucía revolutionized the art of flamenco. Along with his virtuosic guitar playing, de Lucía incorporated the Afro-Peruvian sounds of the cajón, and collaborated with musicians as far-ranging as Al Di Meola, Chick Corea and Carlos Santana. On Friday, longtime de Lucía collaborator and producer Javier Limón will reassemble the band that toured with the guitar master during the last 10 years of his life for a performance at the Empire. In May of 2012, de Lucía played his final U.S. tour date at Austin’s Riverbend Centre before his untimely death two years later. If you were lucky enough to catch that show, then you’re familiar with the magnitude of talent this ensemble boasts, from guitarist Antonio Sánchez (who happens to be de Lucía’s nephew) to vocalist David de Jacoba and dancer Farruco (the brother of the great flamenco dancer Farruquito). Beyond a mere tribute band, the Paco de Lucía Project honors the legacy of this musical genius while blazing a new trail for the future of flamenco. $29-$99, 7:30pm, Charline McCombs Empire Theatre, 226 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 226-3333, artssa.org. — Marco Aquino

COURTESY
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Fri 11/10 - Sat 11/11
San Antonio’s Historic Market Square

Locals and tourists alike are likely to have colorful memories of San Antonio’s historic Market Square in central downtown. South Texas native Edna Campos Gravenhorst has released a book delving into the history and significance of the 210’s “El Mercado,” titled San Antonio’s Historic Market Square. She’s an established author and certified San Antonio tourism ambassador (so basically, she knows her stuff). As the book informs the reader, San Antonio’s founding in 1718 prompted a demand for plazas with businesses and parks. The city’s growth meant relocating the established markets, eventually giving way to a farmers market that developed into the Market Square we now know for its shops, tourist stops and late-night bites at Mi Tierra. Gravenhorst will be signing copies of her book and giving presentations this week at The Twig Book Shop (free, 5-7pm Fri, 306 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 106) and Dead Tree Bookstore (free, 2-4pm Sat, 5645 S. Flores St., Suite 105). — Kelsey Valadez

COURTESY
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Sat 11/11
‘Partners in Art’

With the confluence of Luminaria and Southtown The Arts District (STAD) Festival, November’s Second Saturday art walk promises to be a creative affair to remember. Bringing a dose of fresh blood to the Freight Gallery & Studios complex, the simply titled, artist-run Southtown Art Gallery opens its doors with “Partners in Art,” a group show uniting 14 emerging artists that gallery co-directors Albert Gonzales and Caroline Adam say aren’t “typically accustomed to working together.” Bringing together names both familiar (portrait artist Kaldric Deshon Dow and retro-digital collage specialist Acidwinzip among them) and no-so-familiar (including illustrator Gilbert Martinez, tattoo artist Esther Quiara and painter Elias Vieyra), the inaugural outing’s billed as “a celebration of vigilance — and those who take justice into their own hands to change the world.” $1-$2, 6:30-10:30pm, Southtown Art Gallery, 1913 S. Flores St., Studio 9, (210) 441-0075, facebook.com/southtownartgallery. — BR

COURTESY
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Sat 11/11
‘Goddess Speaks: A Visionary Journey Through Goddess Culture’

The local creative known as Jagwired Art shares the completion of her goddess series at the Movement Gallery. The project first took shape three years ago and involved a study of “goddesses from across the world” with emphasis on their significance in collective consciousness. It’s not yet apparent her specific motivation for the selection of each deity, though it seems to aim as a whole to express the artist’s personal journey of discovery and growth. The series aims to showcase “stories, symbology and culture” through visual representation. Saturday’s opening reception features a Q&A with Jagwired, a dance performance by Laura Rios Ramirez and live music by local R&B artist AMEA. Free, 6-10pm, Movement Gallery, 1412 E. Commerce St., (210) 299-2666, facebook.com/jagwiredartz. — KV

JUSTIN KOVER
  • Justin Kover
Sat 11/11
‘The Difference Between a Flower and a Weed Is Seeing’

Although it’s not uncommon for students to make memorable waves within San Antonio’s art scene, few in recent memory have done so with the concentrated vision and professionalism Iowa native Justin Korver displayed in his MFA thesis show “The Expressive Mark & Other Ideas I Stole from Painting” (exhibited this past summer at UTSA’s offsite gallery Terminal 136). Having previously caught our attention with mixed-media sculpture and installations — frequently challenging gender confines while placing familiar materials and found objects in curious configurations — Korver developed a fairly recognizable aesthetic built around hardware, paint and other supplies one might pick up at a home-improvement store. While there’s enchantment to be found in his monochromatic pegboard assemblages, brilliantly adorned work gloves and everyday tools caked or dripping with layers of paint, Korver’s latest endeavors mark an intriguing shift into softer territory. Evidenced by his Instagram feed, his new solo show “The Difference Between a Flower and a Weed Is Seeing” puts a meditative, almost artisanal spin on a developing body of work from an artist worth keeping an eye on. Free, 6-9pm, Flax Studio, 1906 S. Flores St., (909) 518-2245, facebook.com/flaxstudio. — BR

ALLYSSA YOHANA
  • Allyssa Yohana
Sat 11/11
Girlpool

Formed by best friends and L.A natives Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad, the folk-punk duo Girlpool make their way out of Philadelphia to tour in support of their sophomore album Powerplant (2017), follow-up to the 2015 debut Before the World Was Big. Signed with Anti-Records, the band delivers a deeply vulnerable, pared-down vibe via guitar, bass and vocals, plus the recent addition of drums. Despite a decidedly unfussy format, Girlpool’s lo-fi sound flows effortlessly amid poetic lyrics at times powerful enough to put life back in perspective. Also on the bill: Palm and LALA LALA. $12, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — Victoria Wilson

COURTESY
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Sun 11/12
Harlem Globetrotters

After wrapping up the first leg of their 2017 North American tour, the world-renowned Harlem Globetrotters pay a return visit to the AT&T Center this weekend with their unique blend of basketball humor, slick ball handling and sick dunks. The Globetrotters had a record-setting experience during their last stop in San Antonio — a memorable draining of a 583-foot trick shot from the Tower of the Americas. Fan favorites Big Easy Lofton, Ant Atkinson, Hi-Lite Bruton, Thunder Law, Bull Bullard and Cheese Chisholm are back in action, along with female ballers TNT Lister, Ace Jackson and Hoops Green. The hall-of-fame franchise has inspired hoops-themed laughter for more than 90 years, making the Globetrotters a must-see for the young and young at heart. $22.50-$155.50, 2pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy., (210) 444-5000, attcenter.com. — MS

COURTESY
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Tue 11/14
‘$t@tU.S.? Prints from Puerto Rico to San Antonio’

In an era riddled with xenophobia, “sanctuary cities” crackdowns, “show me your papers” laws, ignorance amidst crisis, and troubling headlines such as “Nearly Half of Americans Don’t Know Puerto Ricans Are Fellow Citizens” (The New York Times, September 6, 2017), the exhibition title “$t@tU.S.? Prints from Puerto Rico to San Antonio” conjures plenty — even without visual reference. Curated by UTSA associate professor Dr. Teresa Eckmann and hosted by Centro de Artes in collaboration with the Puerto Rican Heritage Society of San Antonio, the group show juxtaposes prints created between the 1950s and the present day by celebrated Puerto Rican printmaker Antonio Martorell (as well as his contemporaries and students) with works from seven San Antonio artists who work within the realm of serigraphy. Although thematically bound by creative responses to “the dynamic state of sovereignty, power, political action, heritage, democracy and equality,” the works assembled for “$t@tU.S.?” find common ground in the power of text and its employment for political, cultural and aesthetic purposes. Free, 6-9pm (on view through Dec. 17), Centro de Artes, 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave., (210) 784-1105, getcreativesanantonio.com. — BR


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