20 Reasons to See “Something to Say” & “30 Americans” at the McNay 

Share on Facebook
Tweet
Submit to Reddit
Email
Two stunning new exhibitions at the McNay Art Museum bring together the work of African-American artists from the 1920s to the present. Gathered primarily from the groundbreaking collection of San Antonio residents Harriet and Harmon Kelley, “Something to Say” features more than 50 works by iconic 20th-century artists as well as younger emerging talents. Fittingly, “Something to Say” is presented alongside “30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection,” a traveling exhibition from Miami that has been making its way across the country since 2009. The work in “30 Americans” includes provocative, politically charged work from the past three decades, including Glenn Ligon’s neon sign America and Nick Cave’s sculptural Soundsuit.

$15-$20, 10am-4pm Wed, 10am-9pm Thu, 10am-4pm Fri, 10am-5pm Sat, noon-5pm Sun, 10am-4pm Tue through May 6, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org.
OF 20
PREV NEXT
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Glenn Ligon, America, 2008. Neon sign and paint.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Kehinde Wiley, Equestrian Portrait of the Count-Duke Olivares, 2005. Oil on canvas.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Nina Chanel Abney, Khalique & Jeff, 2007. Acrylic on canvas.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts. © Estate of Bob Thompson; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY.
Bob Thompson, Untitled, 1960-61. Oil on canvas.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2008. Fabrics, sequins, fiberglass, and metal.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts
Charles Alston, Girl in a Red Dress, 1934. Oil on canvas.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts. © Charles Louis Sallee, Jr.
Charles Louis Sallee, Jr., Girl with Pink Geranium, 1936. Oil on canvas.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts. © 2017 Eldzier Cortor / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Eldzier Cortor, The Night Letter, 1943. Oil on canvas.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Henry Taylor, The Long Jump by Carl Lewis, 2010. Acrylic on canvas.
Collection of Guillermo Nicolas and Jim Foster. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.
Isaac Julien, Baltimore Series (Angela in Blue No. 1), 2003. Digital print.
Skip ad in
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts. © 2017 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Jacob Lawrence, The Rebels, 1963. Egg tempera on hardboard.
Collection of the McNay Art Museum. © McArthur Binion; Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co.
McArthur Binion, ghost: rhythms: III, 2016. Oil paint stick and paper on board.
Collection of the McNay Art Museum. © Rashaad Newsome; Courtesy of the artist and De Buck Gallery.
Rashaad Newsome, Kwabena, 2017. Collage on paper in custom frame with leather and automotive paint.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Rozeal, Sacrifice #2: it has to last (after Yoishitoshi’s “Drowsy: the appearance of a harlot of the Meiji era), 2007. Enamel, acrylic, and paper on wooden panel.
Collection of the McNay Art Museum. © Stanley Whitney; Courtesy of the artist and the McNay Art Museum.
Stanley Whitney, Untitled, 2014. Gouache on paper.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Hank Willis Thomas, Basketball and Chain, 2003. Digital C-print.
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Mickalene Thomas, Whatever You Want, 2004. Acrylic, rhinestone, and enamel on wooden panel.
Collection of Guillermo Nicolas and Jim Foster. © Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Titus Kaphar, Letters Never Read, 2017. Oil and tar on canvas.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts.
William Artis, African Youth, 1948. Terra cotta.
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Foundation for the Arts.
William Henry Johnson, Ice Cream Stand, ca. 1939 – 42. Gouache, ink, and pencil on paper.
Skip ad in
1/20
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.
Glenn Ligon, America, 2008. Neon sign and paint.