Special Events

A Day in Old Mexico

When: Sundays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through April 26 2015

Devised during the hacienda system as a method to prepare horses and riders for war and formally institutionalized in the post-revolutionary period, charrería is the national sport of Mexico. For the last six decades, the Asociación de Charros de San Antonio has championed charrería (often described as Mexican rodeo), competing throughout the year and attracting a diverse crowd each April with its beloved Fiesta charreada A Day in Old Mexico. Of the 10 official suertes (competitive roping and riding events performed in period costumes), the all-female escaramuza stands out as a fan favorite. Created during the 1950s and officially added to the charreada mix in 1992, the choreographed skirmish showcases a team of young ladies demonstrating precision skills (some inspired by the soldaderas who fought alongside men in the Mexican Revolution) while riding sidesaddle in colorful dresses named after Pancho Villa’s legendary companion Adelita.

Price: $5-$15