News » The QueQue

Do you know today's news? Thank a lazy journalist!

Quiz time! Do you know what the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act is? Don’t feel bad, the Queque just found out about it last week.

Signed by our paranoid-as-a-meth-head chief executive last October, a section of the NDAA gives current and future presidents the power to mobilize the Armed Forces during “major public emergencies” `see Last Words, page 67`. Under the law, the Dub could legally order any state’s National Guard to, say, stop a protest, even if said state’s governor disagrees. Normally, the Washington Press Corps would have been all over this, which leads us to believe it was passed during naptime.

Reports of Senate Judiciary Chair Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) and Senator Kit Bond’s (R-Missouri) bipartisan bill to overturn the law were also muffled, even though it’s backed by the National Guard Association, National Governors Association, Adjutants General Association, and National Sheriffs’ Association.

The Queque respectfully requests that the DC Press kick off their Transformers blankets and get to work.

River Road Neighborhood Association member Larry DeMartino was very angry with the Queque at last week’s alternative rally against a Witte Museum parking garage (held at the same time as the Witte’s meeting to dialogue with residents). DeMartino branded the Current a “lazy paper” and insisted we were in favor of cutting down trees!

After taking a few breaths, he said he was upset over a sentence in this column that said RRNA was treating Brackenridge Park as their own personal backyard `the Queque, May 30-June 5`. Ever heard of a little thing called attribution, Larry? A Witte spokesperson made the opinionated jab.

However, the Queque will boldly bend over and accept the backlash for not contacting the RRNA for its two cents. (Even though your mistaken soundbite that the City Council was addressing cutting down trees to build a parking garage on a recent agenda had been broadcast as far away as the UK — a preliminary plan is being discussed with City Council on Thursday and, according to Witte President/CEO Marise McDermott, no orange plastic ribbons have been tied around any treets yet.)

For the sake of the trees, DeMartino can get the last word today. He eagerly showed us the Articles of Incorporation of the NNRA — in it, a personal request co-signed by Mayor Phil Hardberger that, to the Queque, sounds like a blessing for the group to treat Brack like their backyard. “The River Road Neighborhood Association shall encourage the preservation of the distinctive heritage of the neighborhood and the surrounding parkland that is Brackenridge Park, a municipal park.”

Here’s another pop quiz, hotshots: Who’s black, a Democrat, from Illinois, in Congress, and visited San Antonio last weekend? Wait — before you put on your O-face, here’s the final clue: He’s not running for president. Stumped? Tsk-tsk.

The answer is U.S. Representative Danny K. Davis, who appeared at the St. Anthony Hotel Saturday night to drum up support for the Second Chance Act (a federal measure to assist prison inmates in their transition back to free society) as part of the first-ever National Conference on Restorative Justice held this week in Kerrville.

Now, to the Queque, sacrificing a Saturday night was a small price to pay to catch Davis, because where he goes, inanity often follows. For example, in 2004 the Congressman from downtown Chicago co-sponsored an event where he crowned Reverend Sun Myung Moon “King of Peace.” Moon then one-upped Davis and declared himself the Messiah.

Unfortunately, Saturday night was relatively grounded. After cooing about his love for Bill Clinton, Davis told the audience — among them former Councilman Julian Castro, Travis County D.A. Ronnie Earle, District Court Judge Pete Sakai, and Bexar County Commissioner Tommy Adkisson — that the Second Chance bill had been put on the back burner after Representative John Olver (D-MA) circulated a letter accusing fellow Democrats of doing more for ex-cons than for Iraq veterans.

(That’s probably true, though not an excuse. In fact, there could be an overlap; according to a U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics Report issued in May there were 127,500 military veterans behind bars in 2004.)

Delegates from the Texas legislature were conspicuously absent from the Davis dinner and the conference, possibly because they’d already busted their asses this session passing ex-offender legislation only to see Governor Goodhair veto their efforts, such as the bill that would require the Secretary of State to remind inmates who’ve served their time that they’re eligible to vote. Also
V-bombed, HB 3200, House Corrections Chairman Jerry Madden’s bill to revamp funding for the state’s probation system, including shorter, more intensive programming and community supervision. According to Madden’s letter to Perry that appeared on Scott Henson’s blog (Gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com), Madden was “surprised” and “disappointed” (read: pissed-the-fuck-off): The bill represented a compromise between the Texas Department of Criminal justice, the Texas Probation Associations, and the Texas Public Policy foundation, and as Henson noted, “The governor gave no hint during the process he didn’t like the bill, he just waited to the end and said ‘Nyet.’”

This month’s notable digital passings: Slate.com has ended its Attorney General Alberto Gonzales career deathwatch, called the Gonzo-Meter, due to this month’s failed no-confidence vote in the Senate over his role in the firing of U.S. attorneys. “At this point, just about nothing Gonzales does could cause the president to fire him,” wrote Slate. Also, the 2-year-old outfit helping Democrats vote with their wallets, Buyblue.org `“Can’t hang with TRMPAC,” August 1, 2006`, shut its virtual doors, we suppose in response to the blue tidal wave threatening to overtake the White House ’08. And the Queque is just about to go online and cancel its Netflix due to widespread news reports of their intentionally slow delivery service. 

 

Send news tips to queque@sacurrent.com.


comment