Art

“Miguel Covarrubias: Culture and Caricature”

When: Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Oct. 18 2015

Rightfully dubbed “Mexico’s Renaissance Man,” Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957) made a name for himself as a caricaturist, writer and commercial illustrator but also made significant contributions to the realms of theater, ethnography and archaeology. Born in Mexico City, Covarrubias moved to New York on a government grant in 1923, fell in with an elite crowd and emerged as go-to caricaturist for the likes of Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and Vogue. Published in 1925, his book, The Prince of Wales and Other Famous Americans put a witty spin on icons of the era (Charlie Chaplin, Babe Ruth and Calvin Coolidge among them) while his 1927 offering Negro Drawings celebrated the spirit of the Harlem Renaissance. On their honeymoon in Indonesia, Covarrubias and his wife Rosa Rolanda became enraptured with Balinese culture and collaborated on the 1937 book The Island of Bali. Compiled from the collections of the San Antonio Museum of Art, Yale University and Austin’s Harry Ransom Center, “Miguel Covarrubias: Culture and Caricature” showcases 140 works, along with a selection of Mexican folk art collected by Covarrubias’ friend Nelson Rockefeller.

Price: $5-$10