Film

Redes

When: Tue., June 27, 7:30 p.m. 2017

It’s not often that a classic film is better remembered for its cinematography and score than its plot and acting, but such is the case with Redes — a 1936 anomaly that rallied the talents of iconic American photographer Paul Strand, Austrian-born director/future Oscar winner Fred Zinnemann and noted Mexican composer Carlos Chávez. Commissioned by the Mexican Government’s secretary of public education, the film began as a documentary but unexpectedly morphed into a scripted drama starring non-actors in semi-biographical roles. Set in the coastal town of Alvarado, Veracruz, the film employs arresting imagery and a classical soundtrack to help build a socially conscious story about poor fishermen struggling to survive on exploitive wages. Following the death of his son, protagonist Miro leads his fellow fishermen in revolt — convincing them to not release their catch until they’re all offered fair wages. Considered by some to be a precursor to the Italian Neorealism movement, Redes (marketed in the U.S. as The Wave) screens in conjunction with Texas Public Radio’s Cinema Tuesdays film series.

Price: $10-$15 suggested donation