Texas Association Of Business: Let The Lone Star State Get Onboard With Ride-Share Technology

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A taxi driver protests outside San Antonio's City Council chambers last year. The Alamo City passed strict ride-share regulations, prompting both Uber and Lyft to stop doing business in the city. - MARK REAGAN
  • Mark Reagan
  • A taxi driver protests outside San Antonio's City Council chambers last year. The Alamo City passed strict ride-share regulations, prompting both Uber and Lyft to stop doing business in the city.

One of the state's most influential business organizations has a message for Texas: make way for the ride-share industry.

"We're watching other states lead while Texas risks lagging behind on policies that regulate ride-sharing," Texas Association of Business CEO Bill Hammond says in a press release.

Hammond wants legislators to approve House Bill 2440, which would provide statewide regulations for Uber and Lyft.

Uber also wants the bill approved and has gathered more than 100,000 signatures supporting the measure.

“Transportation network companies are clearly meeting a consumer demand. Let’s not force Texas to sit on the sidelines as others blaze the trail and welcome these innovative, new technology companies to their states,” Hammond says.

Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, North Dakota, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin all have similar laws on the books, and Georgia, Maryland, Tennessee, Montana, Indiana and Oklahoma all have bills waiting a governor's signature, according to the Texas Association of Business.

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