UTSA's Romo Resigns, Says "The Way I Embraced Women Made Them Uncomfortable and Was Inappropriate"

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SCREENSHOT, UTSA.EDU/PRESIDENT/SPEECHES/MESSAGE.HTML
  • screenshot, utsa.edu/president/speeches/message.html
Surprising news out of the city's largest university last month: Longtime University of Texas at San Antonio President Ricardo Romo was put on paid administrative leave pending a review of his "conduct."

Then came anonymous chatter that said "conduct" review might have to do with sexual harassment claims filed by a former employee. And now here's how Romo explained himself in a message to the UTSA community on Friday, announcing his resignation after nearly two decades at the university's helm: He's sorry the way he "embraced women" makes them uncomfortable.

"I have been made aware that the manner in which I embraced women made them uncomfortable and was inappropriate," Romo said in his statement. He says he understands and respects that UT officials have "concerns about my behavior and I deeply apologize for any conduct that offended anyone."

Romo said he's retiring, some six months ahead of schedule, because he doesn't want to be a "distraction" or a "disruption" to the university. He also said he's  turned down an offer to be director of the Texas History Center at the Institute of Texan Cultures, where he'd planed to spend a year following his retirement from UTSA.

The Express-News reports that "sources close to the investigation" into Romo's conduct "said that the review was related to sexual harassment allegations." That, coupled with Romo's explanation Friday, really makes you wonder what kind of "embrace" he was giving women around campus.


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