U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro of San Antonio Says Postmaster Must Say Whether Trump Directed Cuts

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U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro speaks to reporters outside San Antonio's main post office distribution site. - SANFORD NOWLIN
  • Sanford Nowlin
  • U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro speaks to reporters outside San Antonio's main post office distribution site.
After touring San Antonio's central post office, U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro said he wants to know many of Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's recent cost cuts have come at the behest of President Donald Trump.

"I would ask [DeJoy] what conversations he's had with the president and what directives he's gotten from the president or anyone at the White House about changes to the post office," the San Antonio Democrat said Wednesday at a press conference outside of the facility.



The visit comes as the Trump administration faces accusations it's deliberately slowed down the U.S. Postal Service to prevent mail-in voting during the pandemic. DeJoy, a Trump megadonor, was appointed to head USPS in June despite being the first postmaster general in more than two decades to have no prior experience at the agency.

Castro said he will return to Washington in time for a Saturday vote for a U.S. House bill that would provide $25 billion in funding for the cash-strapped USPS.



DeJoy is also expected to testify before Congress next week about cost-cutting measures he implemented that have slowed mail deliveries and raised concerns Trump is using USPS to rig the election.

Although DeJoy this week agreed to delay further changes to mail service until after the election, Castro said he wants commitments that the postmaster will undo the damage he's already done. That includes the removal of postal pickup boxes in some cities and the dismantling of six mail-sorting machines at the San Antonio distribution center.

Castro said his office has received emails and phone calls from constituents who were unable get medication deliveries on time or are facing late fees because their bills arrived late to creditors.

"Even my own mom had an issue getting medication on time that she was used to getting in two days," Castro said, explaining that his mother is diabetic.

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